Understanding Theosis

Perhaps the most scandalous doctrine of the Eastern Orthodox Church for heterodox Christians is that of theosis, which is often translated as divinization.  It is the means of salvation that has been taught since the time of the apostles, but most Christians have never heard of it, and even some Orthodox are unfamiliar with it.

BECOMING GODS

It is written, Ye are gods, in Psalm 81/82 and in 2nd Peter 1:4 we are called to be partakers in the divine nature.  As I have written in the past, we cannot partake in the divine nature without either pulling that nature down to something less than divine or being elevated to it.

St. Athanasius states,  The Word of God… assumed humanity that we might become God, [1] St. Macarius wrote that those Christians who struggle and conquer are kings and lords and gods [2], and countless other fathers from both East and West have taught this doctrine. Continue reading Understanding Theosis

Remember Who You Are

One of my favorite movies as a child was Disney’s The Lion King.  In the movie, there is a character, Simba, who has left his royal family to be raised by a pig and a meerkat.  He fills his days with play and singing “Hakuna Matata,” which means “no worries,” but in actuality, is practiced as “no responsibility and no need to ever grow up.”  He pursues a life of selfish play, which is interrupted when his father, who is in the heavens, reminds him to “Remember who you are.”

We, like Simba, have left the divine royalty and sonship to which we have been called and have wasted our lives in fruitless play, sinful passions, and the pursuit of the “good life” this world offers.  Our Father in Heaven is calling us to remember who we are, and in the words of St. Macarius, I find that reminder.  He says, Continue reading Remember Who You Are

Struggling Toward Salvation

In Eastern Orthodoxy, I am confronted with an uncomfortable fact: the work of my salvation is in progress.

In my Protestant years, I basically learned, “You’ve already been saved, everything is done, now go and enjoy life.”  But Orthodoxy confronts me with an entirely different path of salvation.  Here, I am taught that God accomplished everything on His part to save me.  But now I must do my part.

It is not enough to say, “I am a son of God!” or “Jesus, I want to go to Heaven!”  I must live like a son of God, like a heavenly creature. Continue reading Struggling Toward Salvation