Myth and Fantasy Meets Orthodoxy

Fantasy and mythology have fascinated me for many years.  Like JRR Tolkien, CS Lewis, George MacDonald, and many others, I have high regard for myth.  In it, we find truths wrapped in story.  Fantasy, when it is done well (which is rare), fits into the role of modern mythology.  Modern classics in the genre are well known by the authors whom I listed above.

My (at-that-time-subconscious) love for myth is part of what drew me into the Orthodox Church.  The colors, the history, the fragrance, the ancient stories and beauty, the architecture: everything seemed so surreal.  I found that the Orthodox Church had a unique ability to not necessarily transport me to another realm, but to elevate my mind to a dimension that was already present but to which I had been blind.

My love for myth blossomed around the time that I became Orthodox, and I began to understand mythology more deeply.  Nowadays, when we use the word “myth,” it is often synonymous with “lie.”  Most myths are not factual, but they are not lies either.  The purpose is to elevate the reader to a deeper understanding of reality. Continue reading Myth and Fantasy Meets Orthodoxy